Ireland's political magazine Monday - Mar 02, 2015
GUBU in 2015: phonetapping.

GUBU in 2015: phonetapping.

By Gerard Cunningham. Late last year, the Irish Times reported exclusively on secret courts set up by justice minister Frances Fitzgerald to regulate requests for Irish data from the UK’s GCHQ. The courts were set up after files released by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden revealed that GCHQ was illegally tapping data on the internet pipes

Nov 27th – justice in red lights

Nov 27th – justice in red lights

By Rachel Moran With the relentless practicalities of running a country it is perhaps unsurprising that our politicians don’t often propose legislation which has, at its heart, the goal of human harmony. November 27th of this year was a welcome exception. With Minister Frances Fitzgerald’s proposal of ‘The Sexual Offences Bill 2014’ we have it


Healthcare demands equality

Healthcare demands equality

By Sinéad Pentony Health is life-defining. We all experience ill-health during our lives and need health services. Health inequalities are reflective of injustice and inequality in society. Austerity has exacerbated this injustice and deepened these inequalities in Ireland. Three studies have recently been published which examine the impact of austerity on access to health services

Letters December – January 2014

On the provenance of Kevin Kiely Dear Editor: Some of your contributors merit a brief – and very useful – biographical note. Others do not. For this reader at least, the most glaring omission in the November issue was the lack of any provenance of the writer of the bilious article ‘The I.T. Gang’. While


Publish or … (Editorial December)

Publish or … (Editorial December)

In the following pages Village publishes the Ansbacher dossier which ‘Authorised Officer’ Gerard Ryan has been attempting to submit to the Public Accounts Committee. We print it because it seems to us there has been a whitewash to prevent investigation of its mostly tightly documented allegations of widespread offshore untaxed bank accounts being held by

Hackles RIAIsed

Hackles RIAIsed

By Michael Smith Floppy-haired RIAI president Robin Mandal recently wrote to members expressing his exasperation at allegations of impropriety and misgovernance at the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland (RIAI). “I am genuinely at a loss to understand how there could be even a perception of lack of appropriate governance at the RIAI and,


More fibbing from the Department of Finance.

More fibbing from the Department of Finance.

By Rachel Mullen. The Government is opposed to the introduction of a Financial Transactions Tax (FTT). There is, however, a lack of transparency about how the Department of Finance position of opposition to the FTT was arrived at. There is also a failure to update the Oireachtas on recent developments concerning the proposals for a

Charter for the Left for 2016.

Charter for the Left for 2016.

By Frank Connolly. The Syriza victory in Greece has its foundations in the polarisation of that society following the collapse of the economy in the great financial crash of 2008/2009, and since. It is rooted in the implosion of the traditional parties, and in particular of Pasok, the social democratic party that dominated the Greek


Consciences of goldfish: Homelessness.

Consciences of goldfish: Homelessness.

By Mike Allen. A person who is homeless can expect to live only until his or her mid-forties. Each year around 30 people who are homeless die in our capital city; most in emergency shelters, a few on the streets. You never hear of them. Their deaths get as little attention as their lives, unless they

Villager – February 2015.

Villager – February 2015.

  Saving trees from themselves. In keeping with its general philosophy of doing more to achieve less Dublin City Council has erected signs in Merrion Square signalling that it is about to begin cutting down 300 trees there in accordance with a Conservation Management Plan. The idea is… well actually Villager couldn’t really see the


Environmental and social agenda Juncked.

Environmental and social agenda Juncked.

New commission has learnt nothing from manifest anger in recent elections. By Lynn Boylan So it’s business as usual at the European Commission. At best. Anyone hoping that the European elections would change the eurobureaucrats will be deeply disappointed. Last month Jean-Claude Juncker, the new EU Commission President, having vowed contrition after his role in

Ah, lads.

Ah, lads.

Private educational privileges. By Niall Crowley The current defence of inherited privilege in the debate about the Education (Admissions to Schools) Bill is ugly no matter how you dress it up. There is the call to ethos and tradition, the soothing reassurance that this is not about excluding the disadvantaged, and the satisfying flexing of


Germany’s unwavering ambition.

Germany’s unwavering ambition.

By Anthony Coughlan. The EU establishes a post-war arena where European Nation State interests continue to work themselves out. Take Germany for instance. That great realist Germany’s own Otto Von Bismarck once said:  “I have always found the word ‘Europe’ on the lips of those powers that wanted something from others which they dared not

Unleash the Irish park.

Unleash the Irish park.

By Hayley Farrell. Dublin is the 21st greenest out of thirty leading cities in Europe according to the 2010 Green Cities Index. London is in 11th place and Berlin, with an impressive 40% percent parks cover, is Europe’s eighth greenest city. Scandinavian cities occupy the top three places of the ranking. Dublin has a modest


EU’s Roman values.

EU’s Roman values.

By Niall Crowley. Sandro Gozi, Secretary of State for European Policies in Italy, caught the spirit of it. On behalf of the Italian Presidency of the European Council he spoke of a lost decade where the main reason for establishing the European Union: the advancing of fundamental values such as equality and human rights, was


Media diversity delusion.

Media diversity delusion.

By Gerard Cunningham. The Bell Telephone Company was born out of the great communications revolution at the end of the 19th century, and dominated the American business landscape for a century, until it was broken up by the US Justice Department in 1984. In its place, the ‘Baby Bells’ were left to compete both with


Vipers’ nest: Ansbacher.

Vipers’ nest: Ansbacher.

By Séamus Maye. Just when it seemed that the Ansbacher scandal had receded into the distant past, up pops Gerard Ryan, a respected civil servant with an explosive dossier. Ryan’s revelations and indeed frustrations, go to the very core of what has passed for Irish politics and institutional regulation for several decades now. The suppression

Ebola’s stigma recalls leprosy

Ebola’s stigma recalls leprosy

By Caroline Hurley Ebola was first identified in 1976 in Sudan in a cotton factory, with bats suspected as the reservoir species. The disease typically occurs in outbreaks in tropical regions of sub-Saharan Africa, though also in Venezuela, Cambodia and Indonesia. The largest outbreak so far is the ongoing epidemic in West Africa, which is